San’in-Okayama Area Pass

The JR San’in-Okayama Area Pass allows for unlimited use of JR local, rapid and express trains in the northern Chugoku area for 4 consecutive days. It includes popular tourist spots such as Okayama, Kurashiki, Tottori and Matsue, as well as access to near Izumo-Taisha.

What does it cost?

Bought before entering Japan: Adults 4500 yen (about $45), Children 2250 (about $22)
Bought in Japan: Adults 5000 yen, Children 2500 yen

When can I use it?

Anytime.

Is it worth it?

If you make one trip up to a northern city such as Tottori (or the opposite) and back around, the pass will start paying for itself pretty quickly. This is even if you compare prices with highway buses.

What are the rules?

  • For use only in northern Chugoku,
  • Usable on local, rapid and express trains,
  • You cannot use on non-JR (national rail) trains,
  • Only available to people with Tourist Visas,
  • Only non-reserved seats,
  • The pass cannot be used on the Shinkansen.

Where can I buy it?

You can buy in Japan, but it is 500 yen cheaper to buy before at a travel agent or online.

How do I use it?

Activating a pass differs according to who you buy it from, so check with the company you purchased from. You are usually given a slip which you then take to a JR train station, then exchange for a pass (you will need to show your passport).

Once you have your ticket, just show it to the station staff at the ticket gates and they will let you in.  They will stamp the pass on the first day of use.

Pass Map

Links

Official page

Published by Matthew Baxter

Matthew Baxter is a British travel author who lived in New Zealand and Japan for many years. Having traveled across these countries, without much money, he has built up an extensive knowledge of budget travel, and also worked at many leading tourism companies in both countries. He also writes professionally for several websites and publications, such as the GaijinPot, All About and the Japan National Tourist Association. Those heading to Taiwan should check out his new site, Taiwanna Travel.